Teenage obesity may cause bone loss - 6to16

Teenage obesity may cause bone loss

Obesity doesn’t only cause cardio vascular diseases. A new study has proven that obesity in teenage years may also cause permanent damage to the skeletal system. As the body weight increases there is a greater load on the bones which then tend to degenerate and deform. Adolescence is a time when the bone density is at its max so bone loss during this period in one’s life is a serious cause for concern. Many adolescents have forearm fractures due to their obese status.
Preventing obesity and developing healthy habits is as much the responsibility of teenagers themselves as it is of the parents.

As a teenager:
Do not go for dieting. If someone in your peer group is dieting discourage him/her in all ways and by all means.
Never tease anyone about his/her weight.
Keep meal time sacred for your family. Always eat together with your family. You will eat healthier and better when you sit and eat with your parents and siblings.
Listen to your parents when they insist on eat8ing something. Eat a balanced diet and do enough exercise to keep your body fit and healthy.
Don’t be a couch potato. Hours spent in front of TV or on laptop do you no good. IN fact, all they do is make your body lethargic and mind inactive.

As parents:
Provide plenty of vegetables, fruits, and whole-grain products to your children.
Include low-fat or non-fat milk or dairy products in the diet.
Choose lean meats, poultry, fish, lentils, and beans for protein.
Serve reasonably-sized portions.
Encourage your kids to drink lots of water, and at the same time limit sugar-sweetened beverages.
Limit the consumption of sugar and saturated fat

Last, but not the least avoid “weight talk,” such as commenting on either your own weight someone else’s. This is especially for mothers as it has been seen that mothers who talk about their own bodies and weights inadvertently encourage their kids to have body dissatisfaction.

 

 

 

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  1. obesity levels are unacceptably high in kids and teenagers

    […] middle-income countries. More recently, they have plateaued in higher income countries, although obesity levels remain unacceptably high.” “These worrying trends reflect the impact of food marketing and […]

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